HQP
University of Waterloo
Tianshuo (Joe) Zhou, M.Sc. Candidate
McGill University
Truong-Huy Nguyen, Ph.D. Candidate Research Topic: Statistical modelling of rainfall processes in the context of climate change Mr. Huy Nguyen is currently a PhD student in the department of Civil Engineering and Applied Mechanics, McGill University, where he is working with Prof. Van Nguyen on topics related to modelling extreme rainfalls and studying its impacts to urban areas in the context of climate change. Huy Nguyen earned his MSc degree from the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Alberta with the research topic focusing on modelling and analysis of short rotation coppice systems. Previously, he worked for the Department of Water Resources Engineering at the University of Danang, Vietnam, for 3 years on topics related to hydrologic and hydraulic modelling, and water resources management. Mr. Nguyen’s work has led to several publications in water resources, fluid mechanics journals, and conference papers.
McMaster University
James Leach, Ph.D. Candidate Research Topic: Advanced sequential data assimilation James Leach is currently a Civil Engineering Ph.D. student at McMaster University. He holds a M.A.Sc Degree in Civil Engineering from McMaster University. He is currently working on Theme 3 for the FloodNet Project to help develop the Canadian Adaptive Flood Forecasting and Early Warning System (CAFFEWS). He previously worked on the HydroNet project, which developed a decision-making process for hydrometric network design.
University of Alberta
Mesgana Seyoum Gizaw, Ph.D. Candidate Thesis Title: Impacts of Global warming to hydrologic extremes
McMaster University
Hussein Wazneh, Postdoctoral/Research Fellow Research Topic: Investigation of the limitations and applicability of various indices used to describe extreme weather events Hussein Wazneh is currently a Postdoctoral/Research Fellow at McMaster University in the School of Geography and Earth Sciences working with Dr. Altaf Arain. He recently completed his Ph.D. in Water Sciences at the National Institute of Scientific Research (INRS). He also holds a Bachelor’s degree in Statistics from the Lebanese University, Faculty of Sciences (Lebanon), a Master’s degree in Biostatistics from the University of Montpellier II (France), and a second Master’s degree in Statistics, Informatics and Numerical methods from the University of Lyon I (France). Hussein’s research area is Hydro-statistics with a primary focus on the development and application of new mathematical models and statistical tools to describe, explain and predict extreme hydrological events.
University of Alberta
Xuezhi Tan, Ph.D. Candidate Thesis Title: Nonstationary analysis of precipitation and streamflow of Canada under a changing climate
University of New Brunswick
Yiming Zhao, M.Sc. Candidate Research Topic: Energy-efficient device-to-device communications for wireless sensing applications
Trent University
Sarah D’Amario, M.Sc. Candidate Research Topic: Linking water quality and ecological variables to high water level events to better understand the environmental effects of floods
McMaster University
Sarah Lawson, Ph.D. Candidate Thesis working title: Framework for evaluating adaptation scenarios to climate change impacts As part of her Masters studies, Sarah developed a framework for the planning of Low Impact Development (LID) in Stormwater Management from an Ontario perspective. Specifically, the framework proposed a methodology to integrate three components as an optimization management strategy to plan for the placement of LID technologies across a watershed. The framework integrated hydrologic modeling, cost-effectiveness, and stakeholder opinions by applying a Multi-Objective Decision Making (MODM) approach. In her PhD, Sarah plans to apply these concepts to climate change adaptation planning. The overall objective is to develop a framework for evaluating adaptation scenarios to climate change impacts. The aim is to create a tool that can be used to assess the environmental impacts of stormwater flooding and hydrological conditions in the urban environment, under present and future conditions taking into account climate change scenarios. The tool will also consider land use planning and cost information to effectively determine measures to mitigate the risk of flooding during heavy rainfall.
McMaster University
Jetal Agnihotri, M.Sc. Candidate Research Topic: Identification of Snowmelt Estimation Techniques for Enhanced Spring Peak Flow Prediction Jetal is a M.Sc Candidate in the Water Resources and Hydroclimatic Modelling Laboratory at McMaster University. She completed a Bachelors of Environmental Engineering at LD College of Engineering, Gujarat, INDIA.
University of Saskatchewan
Md. Kamrul Hossain, Ph.D. Candidate Research Topic: Flood Modeling in the Canadian Prairies
McMaster University
Zahra Zahmatkesh Aliabadi, Postdoctoral/Research Fellow Zahra is currently a Postdoctoral/Research Fellow in the McMaster Water Resources and Hydrologic Modeling Lab. Prior to coming to McMaster University, Zahra was a Postdoctoral/Research Fellow in the Department of Civil Engineering, University of Manitoba. Zahra is a Ph.D. graduate in Civil Engineering, Water Resources Management, from the University of Tehran, Iran.
University of Waterloo
Zhe (Emma) Yang, Ph.D. Candidate Research Topic: Pooled frequency analysis of rainfall data
University of Waterloo
Shabnam Mostofi Zadeh, Ph.D. Candidate Research Topic: Pooled estimates of extreme flow values
McMaster Unversity
Tara Razavi, Postdoctoral/Research Fellow Tara Razavi is currently a Postdoctoral/Research Fellow working on the Canadian FloodNet project. She completed her PhD degree in civil/water resources engineering at McMaster University under the supervision of Dr. Paulin Coulibaly in 2014. Tara’s research is focused on sequential data assimilation techniques for improved flood prediction. Data assimilation attempts to improve hydrological model prediction by merging available observations to model states and outputs.
McMaster Unversity
Shasha Han, Ph.D. Candidate Thesis Topic: Bayesian flood forecasting framework with data assimilation Ms. Shasha Han is currently a Ph.D. Candidate of Civil Engineering at McMaster University. She holds a M. Eng. Degree in Environmental Science from Beijing Normal University. Her research will focus on the development of Bayesian forecasting system (BFS) for probabilistic ensemble flood forecasting which takes potential sources of uncertainty into account and includes adaptive framework that can assimilate new data and information.
University of Western Ontario
Tommy Kokas, MESc. Candidate
McMaster University
Marc D’Alessandro, M.Sc. (Complete) Research Topic: Development of future intensity-duration-frequency curves using local and regional scale methods Marc has completed his M.Sc at McMaster University and has worked on a wide range of projects for McMaster’s Water Resources and Hydrologic Modeling Lab. He completed an undergraduate degree (B.Sc) at McMaster University in 2014. Marc’s current research focuses on developing intensity-duration-frequency curves using local and regional scale methods. Intensity-duration-frequency curves for selected sites will be developed using these techniques.
University of Waterloo
Hongli Liu, Ph.D. Candidate Research Topic: New approaches in the construction of hydrologic models for forecasting Hongli Liu joined the University of Waterloo PhD program in Civil Engineering in September 2014. She completed her BSc in Geography and MEng in Environmental Science in China. Hongli is working on building a hydrologic model spatial analysis framework for guiding discretization decisions, hydrologic modelling of the Grand River with RAVEN software, and variational data assimilation using DDS.
McMaster University
Kim Hoang, Postdoctoral/Research Fellow Kim-Huong Hoang is currently a Postdoctoral/Research Fellow in the School of Geography and Earth Sciences at McMaster University. She received M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees in Water Sciences/Remote Sensing from the National Institute of Scientific Research (INRS), University of Quebec, in 2014. From 2000 to 2005, she was with the Centre of Remote Sensing and Geomatics, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology, Hanoi, where she was a researcher in the area of optical remote sensing applied to natural surfaces, including processing images and spectral signal analysis in agricultural and forested media. Her research interests center on the use of remote sensing (optical and radar) and GIS applications in crops and land-use/land-cover monitoring and mapping. Her current interest is on the use of radar data to retrieve soil moisture and hydrological applications.
Université Laval
Mabrouk Abaza, Postdoctoral/Research Fellow Research Topic: Postprocessing of Canadian ensemble meteorological forecasts issued, by exploiting their recent reforecasting product over 32 days Mabrouk Abaza is currently a Postdoctoral/Research Fellow in Hydrology at Université Laval. Mabrouk holds Ph.D. (Water Engineering) and M.Sc. (Water and Environment) degrees. He succeeded during his education to forge a general engineering profile in the Rural Engineering, Water and Forestry field. Mabrouk comes from a multidisciplinary education that helped him to have many experiences in hydraulics, hydrology, hydrogeology, fluid mechanics, soil mechanics as well as technical knowledge in terms of modeling and GIS.
McMaster University
Jongho Keum, Postdoctoral/Research Fellow Dr. Jongho Keum joined McMaster Water Resources and Hydrologic Modeling Laboratory at McMaster University as a Postdoctoral Fellow in 2014, and is working with Dr. Paulin Coulibaly. He holds a Ph.D. in Water Engineering from Civil and Environmental Engineering Department and Utah Water Research Laboratory at Utah State University, and Bachelor of Engineering and Master of Science degrees from Korea University. Dr. Keum’s research interests cover hydrology, water resources systems and engineering, and decision-support tools for water resources and quality management. Dr. Keum currently works for the FloodNet project, specifically in Theme 3: Development of Canadian Adaptive Flood Forecasting and Early Warning System (CAFFEWS), and the HydroNet project, which develops a decision-making process to design hydrometric networks.
University of Manitoba
Ameer Muhammad, Ph.D. Candidate Thesis Title: Ensemble Flood Forecasting with Data Assimilation in the Upper Assiniboine River Basin (Draft)
Université Laval
Carine Poncelet, Postdoctoral/Research Fellow
Université Laval
Mohammed Amine Bessar, Ph.D. Candidate Research Topic: Ensemble forecasting of water levels in rivers Related FloodNet Project: Evaluation of flood warning based on a hydraulic model with assimilation and hydrological ensemble forecasts M. Amine Bessar is currently a Ph.D. Candidate in in Water Engineering at Université Laval with a passion for understanding, analysing and modelling hydrologic and hydraulic phenomena such as floods. Before joining Université Laval in January 2016, Amine accumulated an extensive experience of more than 8 years as a Hydraulic/Hydrology consulting engineer in Morocco. His work involved many projects related to water resources engineering: hydraulic and hydrologic modelling for floodplain delineation; design of hydraulic structures; water quality analysis and modelling, and water management and protection. Amine’s interests involve developing skills in ensemble hydraulic and hydrologic forecasting, uncertainty quantification and reduction, data assimilation, satellite and spatial data analysis and interpretation for calibration and data assimilation in hydraulic modelling.
Trent University
Ceara Talbot, M.Sc. Candidate Research Topic: Evaluating changes in nutrients caused by flooding and the effects of these changes on ecosystem services
McMaster University
Poulomi Ganguli, Postdoctoral/Research Fellow
University of Guelph
Elené Ueckermann, M.Sc. Candidate After completing a B.Sc. of Environmental Geoscience and Geomatics, my current research objective is to develop an approach for extracting remotely sensed soil moisture data over several Canadian watersheds, and establishing the strength of its relationship to the basin’s runoff ratio.
McGill University
Sarah El Outayek, Ph.D. Candidate Research Topic: Stochastic Modeling of Extreme Hydrologic Processes Sarah El Outayek is currently a PhD student at McGill University in the Department of Civil Engineering and Applied Mechanics. She holds a B.Eng. degree in Civil Engineering with a minor in Environmental Engineering from the Lebanese American University (Lebanon). In 2015, she joined McGill University to pursue her M.Eng. degree in Civil Engineering, with concentration in Environmental Engineering, then she fast-tracked her Masters to PhD and started her doctoral studies in January 2016. Sarah is involved in theme 1-4 of the FloodNet project, and her research area is mainly focused on techniques related to modelling and prediction of extreme rainfall and flood events.
Université de Moncton
Mounada Gbadamassi, M.Sc. Candidate
McMaster University
Dayal Wijayarathne, Ph.D. Candidate
University of Manitoba
Ziyang Zhang, M.Sc. Candidate University of Manitoba Ziyang Zhang is currently a M.Sc. Candidate in Water Resources Engineering at the University of Manitoba. He holds a B.Sc. in Civil Engineering at the University of Manitoba. His research work is under FloodNet Theme 1-6. He is currently investigating (1) the Generalized Logistic Distribution for flood frequency analysis on Canadian flood records and (2) Catchment regionalization in terms of flood regime in Canada.
Université Laval
Hajar Nikghalb Ashouri, Ph.D. Candidate Research Topic: Water resources management using ensemble hydrologic forecasts Hajar is a Ph.D. student in Civil and Environmental Engineering at Laval University, Québec, Canada. She is working on the Canadian FloodNet project with specific focus on studying real-time reservoir operation using temporal optimization and hydrological ensemble forecasts.
Université de Moncton
Babacar Bachir Dieng, M.Sc. Candidate Université de Moncton Babacar will work on improving a computer program using R to extract POT events from daily stream flow data. The program extracts POT events and calculates their “intensity” (peak flow above the threshold), their duration and their volume (cumulative flow above the threshold). He will add tests of goodness of fit of statistical distributions to the computer program, as well as a procedure for calculating confidence intervals for extreme flood quantiles.
University of Alberta
Yang Yang, Ph.D. Candidate
University of Waterloo
Martin Durocher, Postdoctoral/Research Fellow Research topic: Spatial modeling of hydrological risk Martin Durocher is currently a Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Waterloo. He holds a Ph.D. in Water Science from the Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique (INRS) and a Master’s degree in Statistics from the University of Sherbrooke. His research focuses on the integration and the validation of modern statistical techniques for the modeling of hydrological variables. His thesis concentrates on the prediction of return periods at ungauged locations using non-parametric regression and spatial statistics. Recently, he investigates copula theory in context of spatial analysis. Inside the FloodNet project, Martin is involved in theme 1-6 for the development of a new flood estimation manual and software for flood estimation in Canada.
Université Laval
Jing Xu, Ph.D. Candidate
Université Laval
Emixi Valdez, M.Sc. Candidate
Nosheen Alamgir
McMaster University
McMaster University
Jun Wang, Ph.D. Candidate
McMaster University
Julien Gordon, M.A. Candidate
Université Laval
Philippe Richard, Ph.D. Candidate
Université Laval
Frédéric Boulay-Côté, M.Sc. Candidate Research Topic: Ensemble forecasting of water levels in rivers
University of Saskatchewan
Mohamed Ahmed, Ph.D. Candidate Research Topic: Flood Risk Assessment
McMaster University
Zihao Zhang, M.Eng. Candidate
McMaster University
Wan Miao, M.Eng. Candidate
McMaster University
Pavneet Brar, Ph.D. Candidate
University of Guelph
Manoj Kizhakkeniyil, Postdoctoral/Research Fellow
Trent University
Christina Fasching, Postdoctoral/Research Fellow Research Topic: Advancing the current understanding on the impact of long-term hydrological changes and extreme events on carbon and nutrient dynamics in streams Christina Fasching is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at Trent University. She completed her Ph.D. in Limnology at the University of Vienna after which she worked for 2 years in the field of Big Data. Combining her knowledge and skills in limnology and data science, her current research focuses on the understanding of the biogeochemical processes which govern carbon and nutrient fluxes at the stream ecosystem level over a range of time scales, particularly in the light of global climatic and environmental changes.
University of New Brunswick
Jianguo Xie, M.Sc. Candidate
University of New Brunswick
Xi Tao, Ph.D. Candidate
Université Laval
Antoine Thiboult, Postdoctoral/Research Fellow During his Ph.D., Antoine developed a probabilistic hydrological forecasting framework that relies on data assimilation and a multimodel approach, to decipher the main sources of predictive uncertainty. Antoine is now working as a postdoctoral researcher and combines hydraulic models, data assimilation and hydrological ensemble forecasts to enhance the quality of flood warnings.
McMaster University
Frezer Seid Awol, Ph.D. Candidate Research Topic: Verification and evaluation of ensemble flood forecasting from single and multiple models Frezer is a Ph.D. Candidate in Civil Engineering department at McMaster University. He holds M.Sc. degree in Water Resources Engineering and Management from Stuttgart University, Germany. He is currently involved in Canadian Adaptive Flood Forecasting and Early Warning System (CAFFEWS), theme 3 of FloodNet project. His research focuses on ensemble verification of forecast variables derived from ensemble prediction system (EPS), multiple parameter sets and multi-models (hydrological and hydraulic models) paving the way for ensemble post processing (EPP) and deterministic and probabilistic flood forecasts.
University of Manitoba
Sanjeev Jha, Postdoctoral/Research Fellow
University of Waterloo
Qiang Ye, Ph.D. Candidate
University of Saskatchewan
Bharath Raja, Postdoctoral/Research Fellow Bharath Raja is currently a Postdoctoral Fellow working with Professor Amin Elshorbagy in the Department of Civil and Geological Engineering, University of Saskatchewan. He holds a Ph.D. in Water Resources Engineering from the Department of Civil Engineering at Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore and a Masters in Water Resources Engineering from Bangalore University. Bharath’s work in the FloodNet project mainly focuses on developing a systematic approach for quantification of flood risk under uncertainty, and to arrive at effective flood risk indicators to assist in decision making.
University of Waterloo
Kamal Rahimi Malekshan, Ph.D. Candidate Research Topic: Energy Efficient Medium Access Control for D2D Communications Kamal received a B.Sc. degree in electrical engineering from the University of Isfahan, Iran in 2008, and a M.Sc. degree in electrical engineering from the University of Tehran, Iran in 2011. Since 2011, he has been working toward a Ph.D. degree at the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Waterloo, ON, Canada. Kamal’s current research interests include Medium Access Control (MAC), Resource Allocation and Power Control in self-organizing wireless Ad Hoc networks and Multi-cell networks.
McGill University
Myeong-Ho Yeo, Postdoctoral/Research Fellow Ph.D. Thesis: Statistical Modeling of Precipitation Processes for Gaged and Ungaged Sites in the Context of Climate Change FloodNet Research Topic: Development of new methods for updated IDF curves in Whole Canada
University of Waterloo
Hesham Gamal Moussa, Ph.D. Candidate Research Topic: Enhanced Information Communication Systems Hesham Moussa is currently a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Waterloo, ECE department. He holds a M.A.Sc Degree in Electrical Engineering from American University of Sharjah. He is currently a member of the BBCR lab at University of Waterloo under the supervision of Professor Zhuang and Professor Shen. His role in the Floodnet project focuses mainly on enhancing the communication system implemented and developing a WSN that is more efficient and reliable.
University of Waterloo
Yong Zhou, Ph.D. Candidate Research Topic: Cooperative Communication in Wireless Device-to-Device Networks Yong Zhou received B.Sc. and M.Sc. degrees in Information Science and Engineering from Shandong University, Jinan, China in 2008 and 2011, respectively. He is currently working towards his Ph.D. degree at the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Waterloo, Canada. His research interests include cooperative networking and smart grid.
University of Waterloo
Juliane Mai, Postdoctoral/Research Fellow 2011 - 2016 PostDoc on Analyses and Calibration of Complex Environmental Models at Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research (UFZ), Leipzig, Germany 2007 - 2011 PhD at Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research (UFZ), Leipzig, Germany Field: Systems Biology, Applied Mathematics Thesis: From environmental contaminants to cellular response: a 3D approach to model the distribution and interaction of contaminants in living cells 2005 - 2007 M. Sc. in Applied Mathematics at University of Applied Science (HTWK) Leipzig Field: Biomechanics Thesis: The usage of computertomography data to model 3D hip bone structures and simulate different surgery options for implanting artificial hip joints 2001 - 2005 Diploma in Business Mathematics at University of Applied Science (HTWK) Leipzig Field: Production Planning and Control Thesis: selection of historic production plans to improve the quality planning in half ware metal industry
Université de Moncton
Bakary Simpara, M.Sc. Candidate I started my M.A.Sc. at Université de Moncton in 2015 after completing my undergraduate degree at the same university. I hold a postgraduate diploma in Economics and Finance. My research will focus on Seasonal Frequency Analysis of Floods in Canada. This research will allow us to judge the relevance of seasonal analysis in various regions of Canada and to attempt to present a unified set of methodologies for handling the problems of seasonally varied flows in an attempt to improve the accuracy of extreme flood estimates. It will also be used to broadly identify specific geographical regions of Canada for which seasonal analysis would be beneficial, as well as other regions where seasonal modeling might not be needed.
McMaster University
Olivier Champagne, Ph.D. Candidate Research Topic: My research interest is focused on climate variability and its effect on hydrology. During my masters I worked on the impact of atmospheric circulation on proglacial hydrology using a glacio-hydrological model. I studied two glaciated watersheds in the Arctic (Spitsberg,79°N) and in the French Alps. As part of FloodNet, the objective of my work is to study the evolution of hydrological processes under the climate change in southern Ontario. A Coupled Ground-Water and Surface-Water Flow Model (GS Flow) will be applied in several watersheds to determine how these processes may be influenced by climate change and extreme weather events. Regional climate model forced by global warming scenarios will be helpful to answer that question with a focus on atmospheric circulation patterns.
Université de Moncton
Ismaila Ba, M.Sc. Candidate Research Topic: Regional Flood Estimation in Canada I am a Master’s student in the Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Université de Moncton. I have a postgraduate diploma in Mathematical sciences. My essay concerned "Discrimination between the generalized Pareto and kappa distributions for hydrological frequency analysis". I also hold a Bachelor’s degree in Mathematics and Computer Science from Université Gaston Berger, Senegal. My current research is focused on critical analysis of the Index Flood Method and to propose an improvement of this method based on our recent research on discrimination between statistical distributions.
University of Alberta
Hester Scheepers, Ph.D. Candidate Research Topic: Analysis of Northern Hemisphere snowpack using satellite and related climate data Hester received her BIng in Civil Engineering from the University of Johannesburg, and her M.Sc. in Civil Engineering from the University of Stellenbosch, South Africa. Before joining the University of Alberta in 2013, Hester gained experience in hydrological modelling and water resources planning studies at a consulting company in South Africa. She is currently involved in Theme 3-2 of the FloodNet project. Her research focuses on the atmospheric influence on snowpacks in the Northern Hemisphere and hydrological analysis of snow dominated river basins.
University of Waterloo
Xiaoyong Xu, Postdoctoral/Research Fellow Research Topic: Development of ensemble forecast methods for improving streamflow forecasting Xiaoyong is currently a Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Waterloo. He received his PhD in Geography from the University of Waterloo. His broad research interests lie in Hydrological and Atmospheric Sciences, including hydrological modeling, hydrologic remote sensing, land data assimilation, atmospheric waves and coupling processes, convective-scale data assimilation & radar meteorology.
McMaster University
Connor Werstuck, M.A.Sc. (Complete) Research Topic: Entropy Optimization of Hydrometric Networks Connor started his M.A.Sc. in McMaster’s Water Resources and Hydrologic Modelling Lab in 2015 after completing his undergraduate degree at the University of Waterloo. Connor’s research will focus on determining the effects that different regionalization techniques have on the Dual Entropy Multi-Objective Optimization (DEMO) process and developing a metric for determining the minimum network density required for flood forecasting in a specific DEMO hydrometric network.